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To understand how health policies can help improve our quality of life in older ages, it is important to look at health behaviours and their relation to health outcomes. In a recent study, Liili Abuladze and colleagues examined this relationship in Estonia, where life expectancies and self-rated health among older adults are comparatively low in Europe. [...]
Using SHARE data from eleven countries, Liudmila Antonova, Tabea Bucher-Koenen and Fabrizio Mazzonna investigate the effects of economic crises that people experience during their prime working age (20-50) on their health later in life. The results show that when comparing individuals that experienced a strong recession (GDP dropped by at least 1%) and those that did not, people that experienced a recession rate their subjective health as worse and have worse objectively measured health. This effect is significantly stronger for people with low levels of education. [...]
Contribution to the book "Public Social Science"
In the newly published book Öffentliche Gesellschaftswissen (Public Social Science) by Stefan Selke and Annette Treibel, several members of the Population Europe Secretariat collaborated on a chapter to share the best-practice experiences of Population Europe as a demographic research network. The chapter explains how the network assists leading researchers and research institutions in Europe in connecting with political and societal decision-makers, as well as the general public. [...]
What influence do personality traits have on divorce? And how do their effects change over time? Diederik Boertien and Dimitri Mortelmans use the psychological concept of "The Big Five" to understand the association between personality and divorce in Britain, Germany and Flanders. They determined individuals’ "Big Five" personality traits (agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism and openness to experience) using three questions for each trait based on seven-point scales ranging from "Do not agree at all" to "Fully agree". [...]
Against the background of the increase in family dissolution and the corresponding rise of single-person and lone-parent households, Thomas et al. (2017) explore moves related to separation among families with children. Using British Household Panel Survey data, they show that significant gender differences exist, with fathers more likely to leave the family home than mothers, and mothers less likely to give up being close to family when starting a new cohabiting relationship. [...]
Relationship between subjective well-being and fertility for men and women in rural Ethiopia
Why are poor regions still accompanied by high fertility rates? In a new study published in Demography, Pierluigi Conzo, Giulia Fuochi and Letizia Mencarini examined the relationship between life satisfaction and fertility in rural Ethiopia. The study is based on data from the Ethiopian Rural Household Survey, a longitudinal dataset. [...]
Economic consequences of career breaks by gender and age
To better understand the consequences of career breaks within the scope of governmental schemes to support a better work-life balance, research so far has mainly focused on the effects of parental leave for women and gender gaps in wage differentials. Mortelmans and Frans (2017) go beyond these shortcomings by examining the impact of career breaks on the income of both men and women, and across the life course. [...]
Out now: Population Europe's Quarterly Newsletter! Please download it here: Population Europe Newsletter July 2017.pdf If you would like to receive the newsletter via email, please sign up here. [...]
What drives Europeans to continue working after retirement age?
In European countries, working retirees form a relatively new group in the workforce. The so-called “bridge employment” that allows seniors to have paid work while simultaneously receiving their pension benefits is often seen as a resource to counteract the effects of ageing societies. In a new study, Ellen Dingemens, Kène Henkens and Hanna van Solinge explored the individual and societal factors that may affect participation in the labour force after retirement. [...]
Life Expectancy and Maximum Life Span
Life expectancy has doubled from 41 years in the 1830s to 82 years at present in Sweden. Similar trends can be observed in many other countries. Modig et al. (2017) ask whether the maximum length of life has also increased during that period. To explore the pattern of mortality above the age of 100, the researchers used individual level data on all Swedish and Danish centenarians born from 1870 to 1901 in their analysis, which equaled 3,006 men and 10,963 women. [...]

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