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PopDigests

PopDigests are short, comprehensive summaries of research results with a link to the original publication (if accessible online). This allows population experts and other interested audiences to be able to easily access information to the latest research results. 

Readiness to accept a partner with one or several children among divorcees in Europe
In the last decades, partnership markets in Europe have experienced an increase in so-called “secondary singles”, meaning individuals who have been married in the past and who are now ready to start a new relationship. For some of them, dating someone who has children may be undesirable, since taking the role of a step-parent is associated with anticipated relationship stress.  [...]
When women in Europe become mothers this often negatively affects their labour market position. Even though employment levels of migrant women are comparably low in general, little is known how motherhood affects their working life.  [...]
How income and previous relationships influence the likelihood of repartnering
Increasing divorce and separation rates among couples make repartnering an important factor to understand the dynamics of partnership formation today. Using register data from Belgium, Inge Pasteels and Dimitri Mortelmans (2017) from the University of Antwerp, explore how economic resources and an individual’s previous union influence the likelihood of finding a new partner. Thereby, they contribute to existing literature about socioeconomic determinants of repartnering in two ways: (1) they compare the economic determinants of repartnering for divorcees with those of former cohabiters; (2) they elaborate on the concept of economic resources by considering two dimensions of income in a time-varying way –  amount of income and composition of income (from labour, unemployment benefits or integration income). [...]
In today’s ageing societies, assessing subjective well-being  in later life has gained substantial attention among researchers, as well as among policymakers in the areas of economic, health, and social policies. However, remarkably little is known about how older adults understand their own subjective well-being and related concepts, such as quality of life, and how these concepts differ between different groups of older adults. Linden Douma, Nardi Steverink, Inge Hutter and Lousie Meijering from the University of Groningen start to fill this gap in an exploratory study of the subjective well-being of 66 older adults of different gender and age, and with different housing arrangements in northeastern Netherlands.  [...]
The role played by the Great Recession in Europe and the United States
What kind of impact does economic growth have on fertility behaviours? Previous research has observed downturns in fertility during periods of economic depression and when looking specifically at the Great Depression in the United States in the late 1920s and 1930s, research found that it had strong negative effects on fertility levels. But what about the more recent recession? [...]
A nuanced evolution
It’s a question of integration, of perception, of cultural influence and, ultimately, of policy. That immigrants’ descendants tend to have fertility rates similar to the mainstream average is far from a simple demographic matter. It’s a nuanced question requiring thorough analysis across countries. [...]
How gender, country and education shape the life course of young Europeans
When do young Europeans move out from their parents’ home? When do they start working? When do they get married? So far, and mostly due to data availability, little research actually focuses on the transition to adulthood from a European perspective. In this study, K. Schwanitz contributes to the literature by comparing transitions to adulthood in eight European countries (Austria, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, France, Georgia, Hungary, Lithuania and the Netherlands). Using data from the Generations and Gender Survey (GGS), she examines whether there are similarities in their transition to adulthood and how gender, country and educational level shape the life course of young Europeans [...]
Does a father’s involvement limit her opportunities?
Dating can be challenging terrain for anyone. For single mothers, though, finding a new partner is particularly complicated. It requires time, energy and attention, and it must compete with childcare for all of them. In some cases, an ex-partner can add an extra layer of complexity to the repartnering process  — at least if the ex-partner is a highly-involved father. [...]
Just not for everyone.
The question of how work influences women’s fertility has been high on the demographic research agenda for decades. For a long time, the assumption was that higher labour force participation among women was negatively associated with fertility. In recent years, however, more and more researchers argue that this may no longer be true.  [...]
With the Brexit underway, EU migrants in the UK will soon have to make their own decisions about whether to leave or remain in the country under an alternative legal status to the one they previously held. In an environment of uncertainty, with several concrete and yet uncharted options, EU nationals are largely choosing the latter. Curiously, it’s the uncertainty surrounding their future rights to stay which leads them to having more concrete plans. [...]

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