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Research News

Research News are short texts, similar to a press release, which allow users to stay updated on the partners’ research publications.

Handgrip strength is seen as a powerful predictor of mortality across individuals. However, there is no research evidence about the levels and predictive ability of grip strength for mortality in Russian populations compared to the predictive ability of grip strength of other European populations, e.g. in England and Denmark. In England life expectancy levels are close to the EU average, while grip strength levels are slightly above EU average. Denmark has a below-average life expectancy level across EU countries, but it is one of the countries with the highest grip strength scores. [...]
Does the lifestyle before childbirth influences the wellbeing of the new parents?
It is well known that having a child requires some lifestyle adjustments. Parenthood can hinder the wellbeing of new parents since it is difficult to combine the demands of a child with work and leisure. In this study, A. Roeters, J.J. Mandemakers and M. Voorpostel  take into account the lifestyle differences of individuals before becoming parents. Using data from eleven waves of the Swiss Household Panel, the researchers investigate to what extent individuals’ participation in leisure activities and paid work moderates the effects of parenthood on wellbeing. [...]
What drives Europeans to continue working after retirement age?
In European countries, working retirees form a relatively new group in the workforce. The so-called "bridge employment" that allows seniors to have paid work while simultaneously receiving their pension benefits is often seen as a resource to counteract the effects of ageing societies. In a new study, Ellen Dingemens, Kène Henkens and Hanna van Solinge explored the individual and societal factors that may affect participation in the labour force after retirement. [...]
To understand how health policies can help improve our quality of life in older ages, it is important to look at health behaviours and their relation to health outcomes. In a recent study, Liili Abuladze and colleagues examined this relationship in Estonia, where life expectancies and self-rated health among older adults are comparatively low in Europe. [...]
Using SHARE data from eleven countries, Liudmila Antonova, Tabea Bucher-Koenen and Fabrizio Mazzonna investigate the effects of economic crises that people experience during their prime working age (20-50) on their health later in life. The results show that when comparing individuals that experienced a strong recession (GDP dropped by at least 1%) and those that did not, people that experienced a recession rate their subjective health as worse and have worse objectively measured health. This effect is significantly stronger for people with low levels of education. [...]
Relationship between subjective well-being and fertility for men and women in rural Ethiopia
Why are poor regions still accompanied by high fertility rates? In a new study published in Demography, Pierluigi Conzo, Giulia Fuochi and Letizia Mencarini examined the relationship between life satisfaction and fertility in rural Ethiopia. The study is based on data from the Ethiopian Rural Household Survey, a longitudinal dataset. [...]
Economic consequences of career breaks by gender and age
To better understand the consequences of career breaks within the scope of governmental schemes to support a better work-life balance, research so far has mainly focused on the effects of parental leave for women and gender gaps in wage differentials. Mortelmans and Frans (2017) go beyond these shortcomings by examining the impact of career breaks on the income of both men and women, and across the life course. [...]
Against the background of the increase in family dissolution and the corresponding rise of single-person and lone-parent households, Thomas et al. (2017) explore moves related to separation among families with children. Using British Household Panel Survey data, they show that significant gender differences exist, with fathers more likely to leave the family home than mothers, and mothers less likely to give up being close to family when starting a new cohabiting relationship. [...]
New research shows they do.
In a study published by the Journal of Happiness Studies, Niclas Berggren, Christian Bjørnskov and Therese Nilsson investigated the role played by laws that treat everyone equally, irrespective of sexual orientation, on people’s general life satisfaction. The authors looked at three measures of rights for gays and lesbians: (absence of) persecution (concerning the legality of same-sex relations), recognition (concerning marriage, adoption and age of consent) and protection (concerning inclusion of sexual orientation in anti-discrimination laws) in a broad set of countries. [...]
But not by segregation
To be sure, the intrinsic cultural and societal value of ethnic diversity is a hard thing to measure. The benefit of ethnic diversity is multifaceted and often intangible. Lately, it’s also been questioned. [...]

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