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The Baltic Sea States Project

Conducted by

Ulrich Becker (Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Munich, Germany - MPISOC)

Mikko Myrskylä (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany - MPIDR)

Axel Börsch-Supan (Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Munich, Germany - MPISOC)

James W. Vaupel (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Germany - MPIDR)





in collaboration with

Maarten Jacob Bijlsma (MPIDR), Aimie Bouju (MPIDR/Population Europe), Jennifer Caputo (MPIDR), Inna Danilova (MPIDR),  Andreas Edel (MPIDR/Population Europe), Pavel Grigoriev (MPIDR), Julia Hagn (MPISOC), Andreas Höhn (MPIDR), Yaoyue Hu (MPIDR), Christian Hunkler (MPISOC), Aiva Jasilioniene (MPIDR), Domantas Jasilionis (MPIDR), Dmitri A. Jdanov (MPIDR), May Khourshed (MPISOC), Emily Lines (MPIDR/Population Europe), Diana López-Falcón (MPISOC), Romuald Méango (MPISOC), Jessica Nisén (MPIDR), Anna Oksuzyan (MPIDR), Lydia Veronica Palumbo (MPIDR), Antje Peters (MPIDR/Population Europe), Vladimir M. Shkolnikov (MPIDR), Robert Stelter (MPIDR), Georg Wenau (MPIDR), Ann Zimmermann (MPIDR/Population Europe)

 

On the edge of societies: New vulnerable populations, emerging challenges for social policies, and future demands for social innovation. The experience of the Baltic Sea States

 

In the near future, Europe will face new challenges related to the consequences of demographic change. Because population ageing is inevitable in most European states due to long-term population trends, social and health policies are increasingly focusing on the circumstances and effects of longer lives, e.g. with regard to promoting active and healthy ageing, encouraging longer working lifetimes and designing new public-private pension arrangements to ensure adequate material well-being in old age. However, we must be more aware of the most vulnerable population groups to ensure that every part of society is achieving healthy and active ageing. Little is still known about those who are more exposed to socio-economic disadvantages, deteriorating health conditions or other individual stress factors. To better understand the current situation and the long-term trends of social vulnerability in different welfare-state regimes and under various political and historical settings, it is important to enhance international research collaboration.

This project aims to further this objective in the Baltic Sea States. A broad variety of research fields in population studies will be considered, such as family and labour trajectories, health status over the life course, international migration and mobility trends.

 

Detailed project description