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Books and Reports

This section provides an overview of selected book publications of Population Europe researchers, cooperation partners and from other sources. If available, links guide the user to the publication websites.

This issue of the Vienna Yearbook of Population Research (2017) gives a variety of perspectives on the linkages between education and fertility in low-fertility settings.  It follows up on earlier volumes of the Vienna Yearbook that have been devoted to education and demography (2010) and to education and the global fertility transition (2012).   Get access to the Yearbook here. [...]
This book visualizes mortality dynamics in the Lexis diagram. While the standard approach of plotting death rates is also covered, the focus in this book is on the depiction of rates of mortality improvement over age and time. This rather novel approach offers a more intuitive understanding of the underlying dynamics, enabling readers to better understand whether period- or cohort-effects were instrumental for the development of mortality in a particular country. [...]
This book provides a comprehensive overview on the long-term care systems in 12 EU member states and Norway. Focusing on the legal background and its main principles, it includes a comparative analysis which highlights the principal dissimilarities between European long term care benefits, but at the same time also a variety of features in common. [...]
Recommendation on Social Protection Floors: Basic Principles for Innovative Solutions assesses the catalogue of principles included in the ILO Recommendation on Social Protection Floors from a legal perspective. Despite the international community’s recognition of social protection as a human right, the vast majority of the world’s population still has no access to social protection. In a major effort to address this situation, the International Labour Conference unanimously adopted the Social Protection Floors Recommendation 202 of 2012. [...]
Migration is a reality in today’s European Union (EU). Approximately 20 million non-EU nationals reside in the EU, making up 4% of its total population, and further flows of migration will be a feature of the 21st century. It is therefore imperative that effective policies for the integration of third-country nationals are developed in the EU. In order to better understand how the EU institutions can work with Member States and other actors to respond to the challenges of integration, it is necessary to have a clearer understanding of the public opinion on the issue. [...]
Migration flows are profoundly changing the composition of classrooms. Results from the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveal that in 2015, almost one in four 15-year-old students in OECD countries reported that they were either foreign-born or had at least one foreign-born parent. Between 2003 and 2015, the share of students who had either migrated or who had a parent who had migrated across international borders grew by six percentage points, on average across OECD countries. [...]
This open access book examines the triangle between family, gender, and health in Europe from a demographic perspective. It helps to understand patterns and trends in each of the three components separately, as well as their interdependencies. It overcomes the widely observable specialization in demographic research, which usually involves researchers studying either family or fertility processes or focusing on health and mortality. [...]
Millions of families across the EU are in a situation of over indebtedness, millions more don’t have access to a basic bank account, another few million don’t have access to basic loans such as mortgage credit in order to buy a home where they can thrive as a family. Access to housing is a precondition for social inclusion and can be facilitated by various public policies like overarching welfare programmes, but also (public) social housing, intervening in the rental market, or policies on home ownership. For a majority of families, a mortgage is the only way to access home ownership. [...]

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