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Policy Insights

Researchers and collaboration partners of Population Europe as well as eminent experts from leading organisations contribute to the debate on demographic developments that are of public interest by providing insights into pressing policy issues.

What population ageing does and does not mean for society
by Patrick I. Dick Ageism is, unfortunately, alive and well. In fact, it continues to be so pervasive that even its victims can be caught in the cycles that perpetuate it. [...]
All countries need it, but some seem to want it more than others
by Lucie Cerna Highly skilled people are an indispensable driver of economic growth, competitiveness and innovation. Countries can develop that talent on their own through investment in education and training, but there is a faster way: recruit it from abroad. [...]
By Mark Levels
Making modern contraceptives cheap, available and socially acceptable is the only policy that works in reducing unintended pregnancies, demand for abortion services, and ultimately, abortion incidence. [...]
The European Covenant on Demographic Change is bringing together the right people at the right time
by Anne-Sophie Parent Despite decades of analysis, policy responses to Europe’s rapid population ageing have focused almost exclusively on the survival of national social protection systems. This is too narrow. [...]
An index of generational power reveals the impact of one of societies’ budding political cleavages
by Harald Wilkoszewski, Elke Loichinger, and Patrick I. Dick   [...]
By Miguel González-Leonardo, Antonio López-Gay and Joaquín Recaño
Depopulation is no longer a phenomenon exclusive to rural areas. It has now expanded to small and medium-sized towns and cities in outflow regions. Young people in these municipalities, mainly those who are highly educated, are more likely to emigrate to the more thriving metropolitan areas. The departure of qualified young people is not compensated for, either numerically or based on the educational level of people who arrive from other places. This situation gives rise to negative migration balances and processes of educational decapitalisation. [...]
Neue Einsichten in die Zukunft der alternden Gesellschaft
In den Jahren zwischen 1817 und 1829 veröffentlichte Johann Wolfgang von Goethe seine Novelle Ein Mann von fünfzig Jahren. Es geht darin um die mitunter schmerzhafte Erfahrung des Älterwerdens und des „Ergrauens“, und die sich daraus ergebenden Absurditäten im Zusammenleben von Alt und Jung; oder, wie Jonathan Swift (der kurz vor Goethes Geburt im Alter von 77 Jahren starb) einmal ironisch bemerkte: „Jeder möchte gerne länger leben, aber niemand alt werden“. [...]
Aufgaben – Herausforderungen – Praxis
Dieses Diskussionspapier geht auf die Ergebnisse eines Werkstattgesprächs mit Expert/innen aus unterschiedlichen wissenschaftlichen Arbeitsbereichen, die an den Schnittstellen von Forschung, Politik, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft arbeiten, zurück. Es fand am 3. Juni 2019 in der Geschäftsstelle der Leopoldina – Nationale Akademie der Wissenschaften in Berlin statt. [...]
The integration potential of refugees in Austria is remarkable
by Isabella Buber-Ennser and Judith Kohlenberger We knew that migrants tend to be healthier, more open and better educated than the average citizen of the country they leave behind. What we didn’t expect is that this positive selection bias would be so pronounced among the refugees arriving during the most intense months of Europe’s refugee crisis. [...]
New insights into the future of an ageing society
Between 1817 and 1829, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe published his novella The Man of Fifty. It tells the story of the somewhat painful experience of growing old and grey, and the absurdities the relationships between old and young can sometimes take; or, as Jonathan Swift (who died shortly before Goethe was born, at the age of 77) ironically stated: "Every man desires to live long; but no man would like to be old." [...]

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