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PopDigests

PopDigests are short, comprehensive summaries of research results with a link to the original publication (if accessible online). This allows population experts and other interested audiences to be able to easily access information to the latest research results. 

The study of the personal ideal family size of immigrants has a promising and so far underdeveloped potential to disclose the relationship between migration and fertility. Despite its importance, research rarely approached the role of the personal ideal family size for international migrants in the current debate on fertility and migration in the European context. The study of migrants’ ideal family size has the potential to shed light on fertility norms without the interference of economic conditions and migration-related disruptive phenomena. [...]
Having children requires a lot of energy and investment. But even in countries where contraceptives are readily available and widespread, where childbearing has become optional and financially expensive, and where there are significant compromises in terms of careers and other life goals, childbearing is not "out of fashion". [...]
The use of parental leave by fathers notably varies between countries. However, the underlying reasons for cross-country differences have not been explicitly studied. In a recent article, researchers Eleonora Mussino, Jussi Tervola and Ann-Zofie Duvander used migration between Finland and Sweden as an instrument to deconstruct the roles of policy design and social norms in the differences in take-up rates between these two countries. [...]
The discussion about basic income as a social benefit has been discussed frequently and worldwide in the last few years. A new article by researchers Alison Koslowski and Ann-Zofie Duvander addresses the question, how a basic income might contribute to a change in gendered behaviour. The authors discuss the idea of a basic income from a perspective of gender equality in the Swedish context, where family policies have already led to high levels of female labour force participation and gender equality. [...]
WhatsApp is currently the most popular messaging application with the largest name recognition, by far the largest user base, and the strongest corporate backing since its acquisition by Facebook in 2014. It allows people to easily share texts, pictures and audio files. [...]
Can couples who equally share domestic work maintain their egalitarian ways after the birth of their first child? And how is subjective satisfaction with work-life balance related to equal arrangements? Researchers María José González, Irene Lapuerta, Teresa Martín-García and Marta Seiz recently published a study analysing 31 dual-earner couples in Spain who had practiced an egalitarian division of household tasks during pregnancy. [...]
More and more people are living until the ages of 100 or 105, becoming so-called centenarians or semi-supercentenarians. Women are far more likely than men to reach this old age, but according to a new study by Graziella Caselli, Marco Battaglini and Giorgia Capacci, the age gap is likely to grow smaller in the following decades. [...]
Childless men and women have an overall higher mortality than adults with children, meaning that they die earlier, recent studies show. Mothers and fathers with two biological children have the lowest mortality risks, but it increases for parents with three or more biological children. What are the explanations for the relationship between having children and mortality risks? [...]
Money
In a recent paper, researchers Zachary Van Winkle and Emanuela Struffolino addressed the issue of in-work poverty – an alarming phenomenon which is exceptionally common in the United States. They considered life courses of individuals from age 18-50 who were born between 1957 and 1964 in the United States, and particularly focused on the association between family demographic processes and the probability of belonging to the working poor. [...]
Often fertility rates are analysed at the country level. However, it is also often disregarded that there are economic, political and cultural regional differences within a country, which have a considerable influence on the respective opportunity structure of women and families. In a recent article, Martin Bujard and Melanie Scheller examine cohort fertility rates for all German districts. They provide a broad overview of factors influencing birth behaviours at a local level and to what extent these factors can explain regional differences. [...]

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