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Congratulations to four European demographers who have been awarded prestigious Consolidator Grants by the European Research Council (ERC): Guido Alfani (Dondena Centre at Bocconi University, Population Europe Partner) for the project "Social Mobility and Inequality across Italy and Europe: 1300-1800"; [...]
Genes may have a say in when we have children and how many we end up with - Interview with Professor Melinda Mills, Oxford
“Loci”? “GWAS”? “NEB”? All in a day’s work for Melinda Mills, Nicola Barban, Harold Sneider, Marcel den Hoed, and their colleagues, who recently published a ground-breaking study on the genetic dimension of human reproductive behaviour. [...]
Parental separation and its effects on children’s educational attainment
Separation can strongly impact the environment in which a child grows up. In some cases, it can have the positive consequence of reducing the amount of parental conflict a child would experience. In other cases, parental separation can contribute to an increasing disadvantage for children due to a loss of financial resources or spending less time with a parent who moved out. [...]
Refugees’ settlement preferences are key to asylum policies
Refugees’ post-migration choices about where to call home have stumped many a policymaker. In 2015, it was refugees’ “irregular secondary movement” that rendered Europe’s Dublin system obsolete. Yet it is refugees’ voluntary relocation away from ethnic enclaves that signals successful integration. A closer look at a Swedish policy exposes motivations behind them and how even light interventions can affect outcomes. In 1985, refugee settlement was changed from open to assigned to promote integration by mitigating the growth of established ethnic enclaves. [...]
This gap is space for policy reform
Population ageing will continue to be one of Europe’s biggest long-term policy challenges in coming decades. Older populations have many advantages, but they also have very concrete costs—most notably on pensions, one of the foundations of modern-day welfare states. Longer lives, the result of better health and nutrition, is certainly part of the equation, but this can hardly be qualified as a problem. No, Europe is ageing, and—despite our intentions—low fertility is the reason. Low fertility is also the result of positive developments. [...]
What’s the role of education?
Numerous studies have confirmed that higher educated women are more likely to be involved in the labour market. However, the strength of education effects on women’s employment can be shown to vary across contexts. In a recent analysis, Nadia Steiber, Caroline Berghammer, and Barbara Haas analyze how and why education effects on women’s employment vary across countries and how these effects are modified by the presence and age of children. [...]
Call for participation at a Franco-German conference from March 21 to 23, 2017 at the WZB Berlin Social Science Research Center funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) The WZB Berlin Social Science Center and the Fondation Maison des sciences de l'homme (FMSH) would like to invite interested researchers to participate in the conference “Savoir Vivre! New Challenges for Work and Family Life in Germany and France.” [...]
A new research project of the Max Planck Society brings those disadvantaged by demographic change to the foreground and takes a closer look at the countries bordering the Baltic Sea
  In recent years, leading representatives from science, politics and society have been promoting the idea that the ageing of society is a chance that should be used. Not only is the overall life expectancy continuing to increase, there is also the possibility to live longer in good health. Even more people will be able to work longer and be more active in their free time. [...]
Family structures and its impacts on children’s education attainment
Despite the recent expansion of education, children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are still less likely to attend university than children from wealthier families. This persisting inequality in educational attainment led social scientists to explore a range of possible factors behind these unequal opportunities. Given that in many countries it is very common for children from lower socioeconomic backgrounds to live without at least one parent, family structure has often been held responsible for explaining part of the inequality of opportunities between socioeconomic groups. [...]
Interview with Harald Wilkoszewski
In the current edition of Deutsche Welle's TV magazine "Global 3000", Harald Wilkoszewski (Population Europe Brussels Office) explains the role of demographic factors behind the presidential elections in the United States and the Brexit referendum in the United Kingdom. [...]

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