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Research News

Research News are short texts, similar to a press release, which allow users to stay updated on the partners’ research publications.

Couples who are considering medically assisted reproduction (MAR) because they have difficulties conceiving naturally, have always feared that this decision could harm their baby. A new study published in The Lancet shows that couples can opt for this intervention without worrying about increasing their baby's health risks. [...]
Researchers Nina Conkova, Julie Vullnetari, Russell King, and Tineke Fokkema explored and compared older adults’ lived experiences and coping strategies in two postcommunist countries: Albania and Bulgaria. [...]
“Being a role-model” is said to be one of the most important parts of parenting. So, if we live in an egalitarian relationship, where paid and unpaid work are shared in equal parts, will our children take over these habits? [...]
Caring for one's grandchildren has become a more common experience for individuals partly as a result of a longer overlap between the lives of grandparents and their grandchildren. Existing research shows that around 50 per cent of grandparents engage in some grandparental child care in most European countries, however, this proportion is higher among older people with a migrant background, partly due to greater economic necessity among migrant families. [...]
A recent study by Kelly Huegaerts, Bram Spruyt and Christophe Vanroelen investigates the association between forms of capital and mental health among unemployed youth, with a specific focus on the mediating role of feelings of deprivation and self-esteem as “mechanisms of embodiment”. The study is based on a primary data collection among unemployed Brussels youth in the transition from education to employment. Results show that different forms of capital are related to the mental health of unemployed youth. These associations are partly mediated by feelings of deprivation and self-esteem. [...]
Does health selection or social causation dominate in Europe? Health differences which correspond to socioeconomic status (SES) can be attributed to three causal mechanisms: SES affects health (social causation), health affects SES (health selection), and common background factors influence both SES and health (indirect selection). [...]
Foreign workers are usually found on either the bottom or top end of the Swiss labour market, while Swiss natives hold the intermediate level positions. At the same time, the distribution of the foreign work force seems to be influenced by the origin of the workers. By means of the 1980 Census and the 2010-2011 Structural Survey, Elena Vidal-Coso and Enrique Ortega-Rivera compare the career-related disadvantages of Italian and Spanish immigrants between 1976 and 1980, and 2006 and 2011. [...]
Women live longer than men almost anywhere in the world. The question is whether this is due primarily to behavioural differences and social factors, or whether biological factors also play a role. To better understand the female survival advantage, Zarulli et al. (2018) investigated the survival of men and women in seven populations under extreme conditions due to famines, epidemics and slavery. They found that even when mortality was very high, women lived longer on average than men. [...]
Handgrip strength is seen as a powerful predictor of mortality across individuals. However, there is no research evidence about the levels and predictive ability of grip strength for mortality in Russian populations compared to the predictive ability of grip strength of other European populations, e.g. in England and Denmark. In England life expectancy levels are close to the EU average, while grip strength levels are slightly above EU average. Denmark has a below-average life expectancy level across EU countries, but it is one of the countries with the highest grip strength scores. [...]
Does the lifestyle before childbirth influences the wellbeing of the new parents?
It is well known that having a child requires some lifestyle adjustments. Parenthood can hinder the wellbeing of new parents since it is difficult to combine the demands of a child with work and leisure. In this study, A. Roeters, J.J. Mandemakers and M. Voorpostel  take into account the lifestyle differences of individuals before becoming parents. Using data from eleven waves of the Swiss Household Panel, the researchers investigate to what extent individuals’ participation in leisure activities and paid work moderates the effects of parenthood on wellbeing. [...]

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