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Research News

Research News are short texts, similar to a press release, which allow users to stay updated on the partners’ research publications.

An analysis of 17 European countries
Past research has found that mortality is typically lower among those with a more advantageous socioeconomic position. The "fundamental causes" theory argues that it is the material and non-material resources associated with higher socioeconomic position, such as income, access to knowledge and social connections, that helps these individuals avoid disease, which leads to health inequalities. Johan P. Mackenbach and colleagues tested this theory to see if declines in mortality are greater among those with a higher socioeconomic position. [...]
A European comparison
In the context of migration and integration, social relations are crucial. But establishing social ties in a new country takes time – sometimes over generations. In a study by Helga de Valk and Bruno Arpino, they examine whether immigrants and their children across Europe are satisfied in their life as much as natives with similar socioeconomic characteristics, and how social relations contribute to this feeling of satisfaction. [...]
Does male preference persist after migration?
Sex ratio at birth (SRB) indicates the ratio of males to females in a population, which under undisturbed conditions tend to be approximately 104 to 106 males per 100 females born. This indicator has risen in a few Asian countries since the 1980s, and it has remained abnormally higher than expected for almost 30 years. The cases of China (115.9 in 2014), Azerbaijan (115.6 in 2013), Vietnam (112.2 average for 2013/2014), India (110.0 average for 2011/2013) and Albania (109.0 average for 2012/2013) are a few examples. [...]
How divorce impacts school performance among children of immigrant mothers in Sweden
Most research on the effects of family dynamics on children’s life chances based on immigrant background has focused on the United States. Authors Jeylan Erman and Juho Härkönen conducted one of the first studies that looked at Europe and sought to find out whether the effect of parental separation on educational achievement varies between immigrant backgrounds in Sweden. Using Swedish population register data on birth cohorts of children born in Sweden in 1995 and 1996, they found that the effect of parental separation varies between different immigrant backgrounds. [...]
The way individuals perceive the state of their health has been found to be a predictor of longevity. Still, very little is known about the role played by genetic and environmental factors on how men and women evaluate their health status at different stages of their life course. Franz et al. (2017) start to fill this gap by using IGEMS data, an international consortium of nine existing longitudinal twin and family studies in Denmark, Sweden, and the US. The sample used included more than 12,000 adult twins ranging from 30- to 85-years-old. [...]
A look at fertility levels of Russians living in Estonia
To help societies in Europe combat their decreasing fertility rates, many see the immigrant populations as a potential solution to help alleviate the situation. However, this is not always reality. In a recent study, Allan Puur and colleagues give some evidence by examining childbearing behaviours of Russians in Estonia. [...]
Armenia and Georgia in comparative perspective
Mortality trends in former Soviet Republics differ substantially among countries. While these trends have been well-documented for Russia and other northern former Soviet Republics, little is known about countries located in the southern tier of the region. To begin to fill this gap, Duthé et al. (2017) present evidence from Georgia and Armenia and compare it with countries which we know more about, namely Kyrgyzstan and Russia. Results show that Armenia and Georgia have similar levels of adult mortality as Kyrgystan. [...]
A look at Norway
Whether children stabilize or destabilize unions has long interested nearly everyone. Most studies by social scientists indicate the former—that kids are a stabilizing force in relationships—but union types are becoming more diverse, and with them social norms. In their recent study, Rannveig Kaldager Hart, Torkild Hovde Lyngstad and Elina Vinberg take another look at Norway and expand on previous research by including data on cohabiting couples. Plus, by using data from the Norwegian Generations and Gender Programme, they were able to look at changes over time. [...]
Can partner care by older couples pave the way to more gender equality?
The image of women as the only caregivers in families is being questioned as demographic evidence becomes more and more available. By exploring two national surveys, the Spanish Survey on Disability, Personal Autonomy and Dependency (EDAD) from 2008 and the 2002-2003 Level-of-Living Survey by Statistic’s Sweden, Antonio Abellan and colleagues looked at dynamics inside households. The author’s main focus lied on the household structure, i.e. intergenerational, single- or couples-only living arrangements, and on the identification of the caregiver for each household type. [...]
Social norms determine how we use our time, which affects our marriages
Between American, Spanish and French couples, who spends the most time together? With their children? Without them? The amount of time spent with one’s partner is a well-accepted indicator of marital wellbeing, but finding the time can become challenging with children. [...]

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