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Research News

Research News are short texts, similar to a press release, which allow users to stay updated on the partners’ research publications.

Not his
Of the many causes of gender inequality today, perhaps none appears more innocuous than housework. Research has shown nothing could be further from the truth. Traditional division of labour at home systematically discourage women from pursuing professional careers in favour of work they can easily combine with in-home duties. As time goes on, the arrangement reinforces itself. Recent years have seen more equitable arrangements spread across Europe, but a new study by Susanne Fahlén confirms that this tends to be despite men, not because of them. [...]
Men and women perceive differently the consequences of work after retirement on relationships
With more time than ever to themselves, retirees’ relationships with their partners can certainly be expected to evolve. Hopefully, to improve. But as German society ages, more and more retirees are engaging in bridge employment, paid work between the retirement from full-time work and complete withdrawal from the labour market. The consequences of this trend on relationships after retirement are still unclear, but a new study from Andreas Mergenthaler and Volker Cihlar shows that, as ever, there is a gender dimension to the question. [...]
Better health is not often the first consequence of unemployment benefits that comes to mind. New research suggests it shouldn’t be the last, though. In a recent study, Jonathan Cylus and Mauricio Avendano find that those out of work who received unemployment benefits were healthier than comparable unemployed people who did not. Good health is a fundamental policy goal everywhere, so, like any policy area, the health dimension of unemployment benefits deserves some attention. [...]
Not the advantage it’s often imagined
Part rite of passage, part badge of privilege. Proof of Europe and strategy for adapting to a globalising economy. Studying abroad is many things to many people. But is it effective? [...]
A comparison of forms of care used by older natives and migrant residents in Switzerland
A close look at the ageing process betrays a complex interaction of demographic policies and factors. Old age care arrangements are a window into that interaction. But what does this mean when the ageing process also affects the migrant population? Claudio Bolzman and Giacomo Vagni compare old age care arrangements used in Switzerland by migrants and native Swiss. Specifically, they investigated whether older migrants find their way to formal care services as often as older Swiss natives despite language barriers, lower levels of education, and fewer economic resources. [...]
If education is the key to a brighter future, then keeping kids in school is essential. It is obvious, but not always easy. The EU recognises dropping out of school as a "new social risk", a hazard for both growth and cohesion, and has accordingly made reducing it to less than 10% a Europe 2020 priority. [...]
Whether more education leads to more childlessness depends on the policy context
Long before we had the numbers, it was assumed more education among women would increase childlessness among them. More education means more autonomy and/or more to lose, the arguments go. Closer study in recent years has revealed a more complicated relationship. [...]

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