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Videos

Population Europe Inter-Faces are a series of video interviews with leading demographic experts on Population Europe’s YouTube channel and other video material of general interest produced by the partner institutes. Users can gain first-hand insights about demographic developments, which may affect individual life courses and future policies.

Les familles se sont profondément modifiées depuis les années 60 : réduction de leur taille, diversité des statuts conjugaux, croissance du nombre de divorces et des recompositions familiales, montée de l’activité féminine… Quelles évolutions ont le plus affecté les rôles des hommes et femmes au sein de la famille ? Comment faisait-on famille hier et comment le fait-on aujourd’hui ? Quelles sont les conséquences en termes de droits des parents ? Le 22 septembre 2015, l'Ined célébrait ses 70 ans lors d'une journée-débats. [...]
The population in Europe is continuously changing. People are living longer, having few children, and more people are moving to Europe. All of these changes contribute to demographic change. It is important, particularly for younger generations, to learn about demography and how it affects their lives. This video provides a short introduction to the field of demography and the app "A Life Journey". This app is a fun, interactive way to learn more about demography and demographic change in Europe. [...]
Our app "A Life Journey" provides insights on the topic of demographic change in Europe and also introduces individuals to the field of population studies. To find out how to use our app "A Life Journey", please watch this short video to learn about all of its features and content. Download for your iPhone© here [...]
CPC was delighted that Professor Jonathan Portes gave the January Seminar. Jonathan started his career at HM Treasury in 1987, and spent most of his career as a civil servant, serving as Chief Economist at the Department for Work and Pensions from 2002 to 2008 and Chief Economist at the Cabinet Office from 2008 to 2011. He led the Cabinet Office’s economic analysis and economic policy work during the financial crisis and on the G20 London Summit in April 2009. From 2011 to 2015, he was Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research. [...]
December 2017 Videos: Arnaud Bigeard/Villa Carlotta [...]
Professor Christina Gibson-Davis visited CPC to give a seminar on her work on non-marital births and child well-being. Christina is an associate professor in the Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, with a secondary appointment in sociology. Her research interests centre around social and economic differences in family formation patterns. Her current research focuses on the how divergent patterns of family formation affect economic inequality. [...]
Joining Generations & Gender Programme 2020 – Introductory Webinar with Anne Gauthier (GGP Director), Tom Emery (GGP Project Manager) & Deirdre Casella (GGP International Liaison Officer)   [...]
  Figuring out population change,  videos about  fundamental demographic issues December 2017 Videos: Oriscus production [...]
What insights into the changes in the lives of individuals and families does a social science research infrastructure like the GGP offer researchers, policy makers and civil society?  This animated introduction to the Generations & Gender Programme (GGP) explains the purpose, function and value of a social science research infrastructure to the domains of public policy and research. To access the GGP open source datasets register as a GGP User here. [...]
The world population is growing older. With continued declines in fertility and mortality, the global population's shift toward an older age structure, known as population aging, will accelerate. Older adults' (ages 65+) share of the global population increased from 5 percent in 1960 to 9 percent in 2018 and is projected to rise to 16 percent by 2050, with the segment ages 85 and older growing the fastest. Children's (ages 0 to 14) share is falling, from 37 percent in 1960, to 26 percent in 2018, with a projected decrease to 21 percent by 2050. [...]

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