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Population Europe Inter-Faces are a series of video interviews with leading demographic experts on Population Europe’s YouTube channel and other video material of general interest produced by the partner institutes. Users can gain first-hand insights about demographic developments, which may affect individual life courses and future policies.

An interview with Anne Goujon (Vienna Institute of Demography, Wittgenstein Centre for Demography and Global Human Capital) on education. Questions: 1. We are constantly told that education will be the key in dealing with future challenges. What do we know about the role education played in European societies in the 20th century? 2. How can you complete missing data about education in a reliable way? 3. What are the main obstacles in this process of data reconstruction? 4. Once this data is completed, what can we learn from it for the future? [...]
Why 70 is the new 60 - an interview with Annette Baudisch (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) on biodemography. Questions: 1. When my grandmother was my age, I perceived her as being much older than I feel now. Is this just a question of perspective, or is being 70 today biologically different from what it used to be? 2. If you look at human ageing in a long-term perspective, what has changed most significantly since the Neanderthals? [...]
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An interview with Arnstein Aassve (Bocconi University) on the impact of recession on the younger generation. Questions: 1. My friends and I are all trying to obtain the best possible qualifications. Nevertheless we are worried that because of the recession it will take forever until we can live independent lives. How bad are the prospects for the younger generation in Europe? 2. Do highly qualified unemployed young people have a chance to compensate for this initial “bad start” later on? [...]
An interview with Athina Vlachantoni (University of Southampton) on work-life-balance. Questions: 1. Balancing my work and family life with two kids sometimes feels very stressful to me and I worry what effects this might have on my health when I get older. What are the experiences of women who are over 60? 2. Does it make a difference whether women worked full-time, part-time, or interrupted their career to stay at home with the children? [...]
Interview with Bruno Arpino (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) on health and grandparenting. Questions: 1. My daughter and her partner are expecting their first child. As they both have quite demanding jobs I would like to offer my help in looking after the baby, but I am also a bit worried that my other activities might suffer from this. What have you found to be realistic based on your research? 2. Is grandparenting as good of a social activity as being in a sport’s club or a choir in terms of benefits for an older person’s health? [...]
"The share of childless people is not that much bigger than it used to be" - an interview with Clara H. Mulder. Questions: 1. What are the most significant changes in intergenerational relations in the last decades? 2. In the future, won't it be mainly the elderly who will need help from their children? 3. So you don't fear a looming war between the generations? 4. Will it make a difference that less people live in traditional families? 5. How can childless people stay involved with younger generations when they get older? [...]
"Changes in partnership behaviour are more significant than low fertility" - an interview with Elizabeth Thomson (SUDA). Questions: 1. Which demographic development in the last decade do you consider most significant? 2. What are the reasons why are people are no longer sure? 3. What impact does this change have on fertility? 4. Is this an area where policy measures can make a difference? [...]
"We need to trust others if we have to rely on them taking care of our kids" - an interview with Francesco Billari. Questions: 1. As an expert in fertility behaviour, which recent development in that field would you consider most significant? 2. Does that mean policy can make an impact on birth rates, or is it rather economies that matter? 3. What other factors are important in the context of fertility? [...]
"The care dimension can no longer be excluded" - an interview with Gerda Neyer. Questions: 1) Which demographic development in the last decade do you consider most significant? 2) Can policy measures help to increase fertility rates? 3) Do you consider gender equality the remedy to counter low fertility rates? 4) Will our lives become even more centered exclusively on work? 5) Which policy measures can be effective to reconcile work and family? 6) Can we handle the extra amount of care needed? [...]
"The decrease in mortality will continue in the next decades" - an interview with Graziella Caselli (University of Rome "La Sapienza"). Questions: 1. Are all European countries ageing to the same degree or are there differences? 2. Will these differences between countries persist in the future? 3. Is there a limit to mortality decline and longevity? 4. What can be done to adapt the pension system? [...]

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