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Policy Insights

Researchers and collaboration partners of Population Europe as well as eminent experts from leading organisations contribute to the debate on demographic developments that are of public interest by providing insights into pressing policy issues.

Interview with Helga de Valk
Helga de Valk on meeting and mating in the European Union single market: Population Europe (PE): Why is research on intermarriage relevant for the future of the European Union? [...]
Eliminating motherhood penalties means rethinking how the cost of raising children is divided between men and women, their families, communities, employers and the state
by Irene Böckmann [...]
Genes may have a say in when we have children and how many we end up with - Interview with Professor Melinda Mills, Oxford
“Loci”? “GWAS”? “NEB”? All in a day’s work for Melinda Mills, Nicola Barban, Harold Sneider, Marcel den Hoed, and their colleagues, who recently published a ground-breaking study on the genetic dimension of human reproductive behaviour. [...]
by Erich Striessnig The future of the European project looks grim. The predominant narrative thread being woven through Europe’s media tapestry—that Europe’s near-decade-long string of crises has citizens shedding their European identities and, with it, their support for European integration—certainly gives that impression. [...]
Interview with Francesco Billari
Population Europe: On July 11th, we observe World Population Day – a time to reflect on population trends and related issues. As the President of the European Association for Population Studies (EAPS) and as the new President of Population Europe’s Council of Advisors, what would you say are the biggest challenges for future demographic research activities in Europe?   [...]
by Aurelijus Veryga In principle, the goal of any public health policy is to make people’s lives in terms of health problems as boring as possible. When people don’t have to worry about their health, they can live out their normal lives, they can spend time with their families, they can work. Here is why I think lives in Europe are not boring enough yet. [...]
Why many migrants and their families have defied Spain’s historic economic downturn
by Amparo González-Ferrer Spanish emigration has captured headlines in recent years. It is understandable considering how historically emotive the phenomenon has become in a country so many were forced to leave throughout the 20th century. But the situation of Spain’s own immigrant population also deserves some reflection. [...]
By Sol Pía Juárez
Restrictive policies including those pertaining to temporary visas, detention and reduced access to welfare support are linked to a greater risk of poor general and mental health, as well as mortality among migrants, relative to native populations and migrants that did not experience such restrictions. These findings are highlighted in a recent review in The Lancet Global Health.   [...]
To reconcile work and family is to improve gender and socioeconomic equality. This means the type of intervention will be just as important as its generosity. Take cash benefits for care services. Intended to provide families with flexibility, evidence suggests they subtly incentivise families to fall back on traditional divisions of household labour. Given cash, families, especially poorer families, tend to engage in more home care for their children. [...]
By Jani Turunen
Children who live full time with one parent are more likely to feel stressed than children in shared custody situations. The benefit holds regardless of the level of conflict between the parents or between parent and child. These are the results of a new study from Stockholm University’s Demography Unit. [...]

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