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Family and Children

Parental leave in Central and Eastern Europe
The European Commission’s new roadmap on work-life balance for families seeks to im­prove labour market participation of women. Women’s employment, asserts the Commis­sion, is “tightly linked to the distribution of work and family responsibilities between men and women” and, consequently, gender gaps in pay and pensions [1]. [...]
Today, there are plenty of different living arrangements and subsequent unions, separations and childbearing with multiple partners that contribute to the growing complexity of family ties, making households with multiple (step-) parental relationships and step- and half-siblings increasingly common. [...]
To date, a large number of researchers have documented associations between lower birth weight and a range of health problems later in life. However, for a substantial amount of existing studies, it is unclear whether these associations reflect causality. Aiming at providing causal evidence in this field of research, Jonas Helgertz (University of Minnesota and Lund University) and Anton Nilsson (Lund University) analysed full-population Swedish register data on siblings and twins born between 1973 and 1994, and followed until 2011. [...]
Key Messages:  The impact of family dissolution on children varies considerably and lasting effects persist for only a minority. To prevent negative consequences of family dissolution on children’s development, policies should prevent economic downward mobility and provide support to children and parents to adapt to new family dynamics and forms. [...]
The British Society for Population Studies (BSPS) is a non-profitable society of persons with a scientific interest in the study of human populations. BSPS was founded in 1973, but originated in the 1960s. [...]

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