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Working Life

This book examines the variation in high-skilled immigration policies in OECD countries. These countries face economic and social pressures from slowing productivity, ageing populations and pressing labour shortages. To address these inter-related challenges, the potential of the global labour market needs to be harnessed. Countries need to intensify their efforts to attract talented people – the best and the brightest. While some are excelling in this new marketplace, others lag behind. The book explores the reasons for this, analysing the interplay between interests and institutions. [...]
EU Migrants in the UK
Key messages: EU-born migrants are more likely to be young, in employment, skilled with qualifications and in good health than UK citizens. Many of them are in partnerships with UK-born partners and a significant share of these couples have children. Withdrawing entitlements to social support from EU migrants, and thereby individualising their social risks, makes it much harder for work-focused migrants to use their skills and capabilities to the fullest extent – with significantly negative consequences for the UK economy. [...]
The OECD series Recruiting Immigrant Workers comprises country studies of labour migration policies. Each volume analyses whether migration policy is being used effectively and efficiently to help meet labour needs, without adverse effects on labour markets. It focuses mainly on regulated labour migration movements over which policy has immediate and direct oversight. This particular volume looks at the efficiency of European Union instruments for managing labour migration. [...]
Late-life labour force participation and health are determined not only by recent lifestyles and work place conditions, but also by factors earlier in life; possibly dating back to fetal stage or prior generations. The pathways from early life conditions to later life outcomes may be direct, through permanent but latent damage that manifests itself later in life, or indirect, for example via socioeconomic achievement and life-styles. [...]
Population ageing in Western countries has made delayed retirement and extended working life a policy priority in recent years. Retirement timing has been linked to individual factors such as health and wealth, but less is known about the role of the psychosocial work environment. A paper by researcher Ewan Carr and his colleagues drew upon longitudinal data on 3462 workers aged 50–69 from five waves of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA). Regression models were used to assess the association of working conditions with preferred timing of retirement and actual work exit. [...]
EU Employment and Social Situation Quarterly Review Winter Edition As in previous editions all graphs and related data are downloadable in excel format by clicking on the links provided. A link to a country-specific statistical annex is also provided at the end of the report. Here are some highlights: [...]
The 2015 edition of the ESDE review looks at the following topics: self-employment and entrepreneurship, labour legislation, long-term unemployment, mobility and migration, social dialogue, skills, and social protection systems with a particular focus on the labour market participation of older workers and women. [...]
OECD’s Pensions at a Glance 2015
by Monika Queisser [...]
Immigration within the borders of the European Union is driven by social and economic forces that are strongly linked to the legal framework of each state. As John Palmer and Mariola Pytliková found in their recent study, labour market laws influence migrants’ destination choices. In fact, the labour market restrictions imposed by some EU member states after the two enlargement rounds (2004 and 2007) have influenced both the magnitude and composition of intra-European migrant flows. [...]

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